Catering

The earliest account of a major functions being catered in the United States is a 1778 ball in Philadelphia catered by Caesar Cranshell to celebrate the departure of British General William Howe.Catering business began to form around 1820, centering in Philadelphia. Catering being a respectable and profitable business, the early catering industry was disproportionately founded by African-Americans.

The industry began to professionalize under the reigns of Robert Bogle who is recognized as “the originator of catering.” By 1840, a second generation of Philadelphia black caterers formed, who began to combine their catering businesses with restaurants they owned. Common usage of the word “caterer” came about in the 1880s at which point local directories began listing numerous caterers. White businessmen eventually moved into the industry and by the 1930s, the black businesses had virtually disappeared.

In the 1930s, the Soviet Union, creating more simple menus, began developing state public-catering establishments as part of its collectivation policies. A rationing system was implemented during World War II, and people became used to public catering. By the 1960s, home-made food was overtaken by eating in public-catering establishments.